War on Wrecks

Some wrecks are visible, some are not, so always be careful when navigating, particularly at night

Some wrecks are visible, some are not, so always be careful when navigating, particularly at night

Anyone who goes out on the water in our beautiful inlets is aware that danger lurks in the form of derelict vessels and badly moored vessels that float free on the high tides and storms.

Last year, the Queensland Government announced that they had allocated $20 million to remove derelict vessels in what is called “The War on Wrecks” or WOW initiative.

So far, dozens have been removed, but the action has not concentrated in the Wide Bay region just yet.

This is why your local Coast Guard spends many hours chasing down boats broken from their moorings, or wrecks washed out of the mangroves on the super high tides.

We have recently been involved in numerous operations, such as securing the detached roof section of the old sunken ferry “Dreamer” and the removal of a part of an 11 metre partly submerged boat from being tangled in someone else’s pride and joy.

Some wrecks are visible, some are not, so always be careful when navigating, particularly at night. New hazards are usually broadcast as a “Securite” during our weather broadcasts, or are available on the Maritime Safety Queensland website.

Sometimes, Coast Guard can prevent boats from sinking if we can get to the scene in time. We carry high-capacity pumps that help keep a vessel afloat so that the boat doesn’t become another navigational hazard.

Recently, we received a very welcome grant from the Gympie Regional Council to enable us to purchase two more portable pumps to carry out this vital work.

If you have any information about wrecks that need removal, you can email MSQ at WaronWrecks@msq.qld.gov.au or list them on the Dept. of Main Roads and Transport website.

Safe Boating – Coast Guard Tin Can Bay