Help us turn up the heat on drug dealers

After the impressive response from a number of different agencies it’s comforting to know there are these dedicated groups around to keep us safe when bad things happen.

After the impressive response from a number of different agencies it’s comforting to know there are these dedicated groups around to keep us safe when bad things happen.

Police Beat – Mike Brantz

I was watching the local weather forecast on a nightly news bulletin early last month, hoping for some good news in the form of rain or cooler temperatures. Unfortunately, the next words I heard come out of my TV were ‘there is no rain expected and the next few days will be as hot as Hades’.

A pretty blunt assessment I thought to myself, but it proved to be close to the mark as we sweltered through the first weeks of summer with very little rain falling to dampen the worsening fire danger.

Regrettably our workload here at the police beat has also ‘heated up’, with a variety of jobs keeping us busy. Most concerning was the drug overdose of a young, local man who found himself spending time in hospital after taking a cocktail of illicit substances. Illegal drug use continues to be an issue in our small town, but the types of drugs surfacing recently are a cause for real concern.

Every year drug use in Queensland accounts for an estimated 4,300 deaths and over 65,000 hospital admissions. While these numbers include legal drugs (such as alcohol), illicit drug use is an issue that affects us all in some way, and we need to make a clear statement to those lowlifes pedalling this stuff that they are not welcome in our town.

Mick and I are committed to eradicating the problem but we need quality information to make it happen. If you see or hear anything, please let us know. If you don’t feel comfortable telling us in person you can call Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or report it online at police.qld.gov.au.

In other news, a dry thunderstorm sparked a bushfire near Cooloola Cove in early December, triggering an impressive response from a number of different agencies. As I stood on Rainbow Beach Road (near Mullins Creek) assisting with traffic control, I watched water bombing helicopters and planes dump load after load of water on the blaze, as firefighters from National Parks, various Rural Fires Services and the QFES worked tirelessly on containment at ground level.

It’s comforting to know there are these dedicated groups around to keep us safe when bad things happen.

Finally this month I would like to offer a big ‘Thank You’ to the Year 6 students of Rainbow Beach State School who – under the expert supervision of their teacher Ms McColl – braved the hot weather and painted the annual mural on our police beat fence. It’s a bright, colourful scene – with a great message – that we will enjoy all through 2020.